Panoramas.dk - Fullscreen Quicktime VR

fullscreen feature | worldwide VR directory | VR tutorials | VR software | VR photographers | about | help

Full Screen Panorama - weekly feature presented by Hans Nyberg
FULLSCREEN QTVR FEATURE > ARCHIVE
panoramas.dk is hosted by: VRWAY

FULLSCREEN QTVR
TEXT ARCHIVE

THE FULL SCREEN ARCHIVE
2003 May week 19-22

Panoramas.dk presents some of the worlds best VR Photographers in a weekly fullscreen QTVR feature.

The fullscreen archive contains more than 150 fullscreens published since februar 2002.
Load panoramas from the popupmenus above in a standard window or from the links below in a fullscreen window
Read
help for more info

Use the Google search to search for places, ciities, countries or categories like churches, cathedrals, mountain,

Week 22 - 2003 Fullscreen of the Week

Full Screen QuickTime VR Virtual Panorama

The Top of The World - Mount Everest from the summit

by Roderick Mackenzie

50 years ago May 29 1953 The top of Mount Everest was reached for the first time by Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay.

Since then 1.200-1.500 has climbed the top. Nobody knows the exact number. More than 140 climbers died on the way.

On May 24, 14 years ago the Australian photographer and mountaineer Roderick Mackenzie reached the summit. He was no 271 since 1953

He made which as far as I know is the only 360 degree panorama From the top.

For the first time on the net you can now see his image as a Fullscreen interactive Quicktime VR Panorama.


Roderick Mackenzie reached the summit May 24 1989.

This is in his own words his feelings about the event.

It is from a book titled Everest Reflections From The Top by Christine Gee & Garry Weare which just been published. It contains contributions from many of the climbers who have reached the top during the last 50 years.


Why did I climb Everest?
I have a theory that people climb for the smell of it. Air at very high altitude smells completely different to lower altitudes. People become addicted to this smell and need more and more to get less and less of it. This is what makes them get higher.

What did I think of on the summit?
When I reached the south summit I was suffering from a lack of Spanish Olives. I was most preoccupied with thoughts of the tin of olives sitting in my tent at base camp. The preoccupation was the result of a very intense dream about olives which was interrupted by the alarm summoning me to our summit attempt. When I reached the south summit the view to the main summit interested me from a mountaineering point of view and all dreamings of olives were banished from my head.

On the summit I felt a mixture of apprehension and curiosity. Our only comments to each other after initial congratulations were about the fact that the summit is precisely half way. It seemed to me that the curvature of the earth was apparent, and I spent some time trying to think of a means to test if this was a real observation or an illusion. In the end I decided it was an illusion, but it was a strong illusion. Overall my main feeling was of surprise. I am often surprised by the situations that I find myself in.

My work in India has been eased slightly by my ascent of Everest. Many people on the subcontinent believe that an ascent of Everest conveys to the climber some manner of greater wisdom in manifold subjects. This I can not agree with, but I never dispute it.

/ Roderick Mackenzie

Today Roderick Mackenzie runs a company which organizes helicopter ski tours in Himalaya.
Ski the Himalayas with Himachal Helicopter Skiing


Prints of the panoramic images by Roderick Mackenzie can be ordered at Everestviews.com

Links:

Everest - Mount Everest by climbers, news

Everest News, Where Everest Climbers Come for News

Nepal, Annapurna, Mera Peak panoramas by Alain Collet

Also view the panorama from the Full Screen Archive:

The Roof of Japan in week 4


Week 21 - 2003 Fullscreen of the Week

Easter Celebration in Elche Spain

by Jaime Brotóns

Elche in Alicante is known for several large fiestas, the Misteri d'Elx in August which is a lyrical drama from the Middle Ages is perhaps the most famous.

At easter there are 2 celebrations. The first is the procession of the palms at Palm Sunday which is dated back to the 14th century.

The panorama is from the Alleluyah Parade on Resurrection Sunday. During this celebration thousands of streamers and religious images are trown down from the windows and balconies along the procession.

Elche is also world known for the Palmerals a cultural Landscape which has been proposed for the UNESCO's World Heritage List

Read about it on the page El Palmeral de Elche which is illustrated by Jaime Brotons.

Jaime Brotóns is a fashion, publicity and editorial photographer in Elche Spain.

Links:

The First Ever ELCHE - ELX Home Page

El web de la ciudad de Elche

Misteri d'Elx

El Palmeral de Elche | The Palmeral of Elche


Week 20 - 2003 Fullscreen of the Week

Easter Parade in Toronto Canada

by John Brownlow © www.pinkheadedbug.com

Easter is celebrated with Parades in many areas of the world. Many of those are religious ceremonies but others are just local traditions of newer origin which often are associated with dressing up in fantasy costumes especially for the children. In Sweden children dress up as Easter Witches who walk around and knock the doors asking for candy.

The kids in the panorama from the parade in Toronto by John Brownlow are from a local school who all dressed up as cooks with aprons and giant sweets.

If you wonder about the giant building in the background it is the R.C. Harris Water Treatment Plant a building considered an architectural masterpiece, of the Art Deco style.

John Brownlow is a photographer and screenwriter living in Toronto but working for films produced in many countries. His screenplay SYLVIA about the poet Sylvia Plath is currently in post-production and will be released in October with Gwyneth Paltrow playing the lead role. He is currently developing a movie which he will direct next year.


Week 19 - 2003 Fullscreen of the Week

House of the Gherasim Family, Danube Delta, Romania

by Douglas Cape © Z360.com

The Gherasim Family are fisherman at Mila 23 a small village in the Danube Delta in Romania.

You can visit the whole house in 7 QTVR linked together with hotspots.

The first also contains a short interview with Mrs Gherasim. To read more about the family read this text by Monica Janowski.

The text is also available on the Fullscreen page.

The 7 QTVR you can see here is only a part of a large educational project called Making ends Meet made for the Natural Resources Institute in collaboration with BBC World Service where it was presented in a series of radio programmes in 2002.

The Danube Delta is a huge area with a unique ecology which during the Ceaucescu regime, until 1989 was on the way to be destroyed by experiments to make the area an economically productive area.

Today the area is strictly regulated by the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve which for the people living in the area is not only a positive thing but also causes some problems as their main income comes from fishing.

The Danube Delta is also under protection by UNICEF as a World Heritage site

There is a lot of information for you about the area and the project at Douglas Cape´s site Making Ends Meet where you can see QTVR from the whole village of Mila 23 and visit the houses of a couple of other families.

Douglas Cape is one of the veterans in QTVR, working with it from the start in 1996. He was one of the first to use audio in QTVR.

He also has a diploma in theatre studies and works as an interactive photographer for clients such as adidas and Patek Philippe.

He runs the company Z360 Limited together with James Waite and Gary Knight.

Links:

Natural Resources Institute

Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve

United Nations Environment Programme


copyright @ Hans Nyberg Other sites by Hans Nyberg Qtvr.dk | Virtualdenmark.dk | hans-nyberg.dk